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Culture of Empathy Builder:  Chris-Beam.

Pending - in development

 

 

 

 

Links

How Does Empathy Work? A Writer Explores the Science and Its Applications

I FEEL YOU  The Surprising Power of Extreme Empathy
By Cris Beam
251 pp. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. $26.

"Depending on your point of view, Cris Beam’s “I Feel You: The Surprising Power of Extreme Empathy” might seem either laughably behind the times or naïvely, maybe even willfully, ahead — so far beyond our collective horizon as to be pretty darned invisible. After all, ours is an age when the president is more concerned with building walls than feeding and educating poor kids, Congress is polarized to the point of paralysis and just about everyone else is seemingly focused on getting theirs first.

 

We’ve become a nation of hard cases, armed to the teeth, with fury battling cynicism for primacy as the default emotion. In this world, a book with a cover featuring one bonsai tree leaning lovingly toward another does not appear likely to find much of a place. And yet here is Beam passionately asserting that “the pendulum is swinging back toward feeling, back toward love and the communal. Back toward empathy."

 


 

I Feel You: The Surprising Power of Extreme Empathy
--by Knowledge @ Wharton, syndicated from knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu, Jun 26, 2018
"The use of the term “empathy” has been expanding in recent years, from workplaces to prison systems to conversations about gun control. Research into mirror neurons in the 1980s and 1990s brought sharper focus to the notion of empathy, but it has since acquired numerous dimensions, according to Cris Beam, a professor at William Paterson University in New Jersey and the author of a new book titled, I Feel You: The Surprising Power of Extreme Empathy. Empathy is ingrained in the psyche from birth, although sociopaths and psychopaths may be born with a “disability” — that of missing empathy. Empathy skills also can be enhanced. Beam explored the various facets of empathy in an interview on the Knowledge@Wharton show on SiriusXM channel 111.

Following is an edited transcript of the conversation.
Knowledge@Wharton: Why has empathy become such an important topic?"
 

 

 KIRKUS REVIEW: I FEEL YOU: The Surprising Power of Extreme Empathy
by Cris Beam
Using empathy to achieve a kinder, gentler society.
After enduring the crushing deterioration of a 10-year relationship, journalist and educator Beam (To the End of June: The Intimate Life of American Foster Care, 2013, etc.) offers an intelligent three-part exploration of empathy’s cultural impact. An opening section devoted to understanding and utilizing empathy charts the groundbreaking neuroscientific studies of “mirror neurons” in the brain’s sensory processing regions.

 

 The author then addresses the mixed results regarding schools that implement the teaching of empathy to both children and adults, largely due to the lack of agreement about what the sensation actually is. Beam effectively uses both personal anecdotes and a wide variety of interviews with people who have gained insight and growth from embracing empathy in addition to those who have become emotionally damaged due to a lack of empathy. She also touches on artistic empathy through the fascinating real-life story of a woman who works intimately with synthetic human replica dolls, work that “explores what’s possible in the hidden, cut-off spaces, what’s possible in the closet.”


 

 

Why Empathy Is More Than Standing in Another’s Shoes

"Author Cris Beam discusses her new book, 'I Feel You: The Surprising Power of Extreme Empathy'

The use of the term “empathy” has been expanding in recent years, from workplaces to prison systems to conversations about gun control. Research into mirror neurons in the 1980s and 1990s brought sharper focus to the notion of empathy, but it has since acquired numerous dimensions, according to Cris Beam, a professor at William Paterson University in New Jersey and the author of  a new book titled, I Feel You: The Surprising Power of Extreme Empathy. Empathy is ingrained in the psyche from birth, although sociopaths and psychopaths may be born with a “disability” — that of missing empathy. Empathy skills also can be enhanced. Beam explored the various facets of empathy in an interview on the Knowledge@Wharton show on SiriusXM channel 111. (Listen to the full podcast using the player at the top of this page.)"



I Feel You: The Surprising Power of Extreme Empathy

A cogent, gorgeous examination of empathy, illuminating the myths, the science, and the power behind this transformative emotion

"Empathy has become a gaping fault line in American culture. Pioneering programs aim to infuse our legal and educational systems with more empathic thinking, even as pundits argue over whether we should bother empathizing with our political opposites at all. Meanwhile, we are inundated with the buzzily termed “empathic marketing”—which may very well be a contradiction in terms. "


 

I Feel You (Hardcover)

"A cogent, gorgeous examination of empathy, illuminating the myths, the science, and the power behind this transformative emotion

Empathy has become a gaping fault line in American culture. Pioneering programs aim to infuse our legal and educational systems with more empathic thinking, even as pundits argue over whether we should bother empathizing with our political opposites at all. Meanwhile, we are inundated with the buzzily termed "empathic marketing"--which may very well be a contradiction in terms."