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Culture of Empathy Builder:  Heidi L. Maibom
 

Empathy and Morality: Heidi Maibom and Edwin Rutsch

Heidi L. Maibom is professor of philosophy at University of Cincinnati. She studied at University of Copenhagen, University of Bologna, and University College London, and has held fellowships at Cambridge and Princeton Universities. She works on folk psychology, empathy, responsibility, and psychopathy. Heidi is the editor and contributor to the book, Empathy and Morality. She wrote the first chapter titled, Introduction: Everything you ever wanted to know about empathy.

 

Empathy and Morality, the book publisher's description: "This collection is dedicated to the question of the importance of these capacities to morality. It brings together twelve original papers in philosophy, psychology, psychiatry, anthropology, and neuroscience to give a comprehensive overview of the issue and includes an extensive survey of empathy and empathy-related emotions.

 

Some contributors argue that empathy is essential to core cases of moral judgments, others that empathic concern and moral considerations give rise to wholly distinct motives. Contributors look at such issues as the absence of empathy in psychopaths, the use of empathy training for rehabilitating violent offenders, and the presence of empathy in other primates. The volume is distinctive in focusing on the moral import of empathy and sympathy."


 "The Good Samaritan" by François-Léon Sicar (wikipedia)

 "It brings together twelve original papers in philosophy, psychology,

psychiatry, anthropology, and neuroscience to give
a comprehensive overview of the issue and includes
an extensive survey of empathy and
empathy-related emotions."

 

Sub Conferences: Science

 
 
Links


 

Empathy and Morality 
Edited by Heidi L. Maibom
(Oxford University Press) (Google Books)  (Amazon)

  • "An interdisciplinary volume that critically examines the idea that empathy or sympathy is central to morality

  • Brings together original papers in philosophy, psychology, psychiatry, anthropology, and neuroscience

  • Distinctive in its focus on the moral import of empathy and sympathy

  • Includes an extensive survey of empathy and empathy-related emotions

The relationship between empathy and morality has long been debated. Adam Smith and David Hume famously argued that our tendency to feel with our fellow human beings played a foundational role in morality. And while recent decades have seen a resurgence of interest in the idea that empathy or sympathy is central to moral judgment and motivation, the view is nonetheless increasingly attacked. Empathy is so morally limited, some argue, that we should focus our attention elsewhere. Yet the importance of our capacities to feel with and for others is hard to deny.

This collection is dedicated to the question of the importance of these capacities to morality. It brings together twelve original papers in philosophy, psychology, psychiatry, anthropology, and neuroscience to give a comprehensive overview of the issue and includes an extensive survey of empathy and empathy-related emotions. Some contributors argue that empathy is essential to core cases of moral judgments, others that empathic concern and moral considerations give rise to wholly distinct motives. Contributors look at such issues as the absence of empathy in psychopaths, the use of empathy training for rehabilitating violent offenders, and the presence of empathy in other primates. The volume is distinctive in focusing on the moral import of empathy and sympathy."

Empathy and Morality: Book Overview Part 1: Heidi Maibom & Edwin Rutsch



 

Empathy and Morality: Book Overview Part 2: Heidi Maibom & Edwin Rutsch

 


Chapter 1. Introduction: Everything you ever wanted to know about empathy

Heidi L. Maibom is professor of philosophy at University of Cincinnati. She works on folk psychology, empathy, responsibility, and psychopathy.


Chapter 1: Everything you ever wanted to know about empathy:
Heidi Maibom
and Edwin Rutsch


 

Chapter 2. Empathy-induced altruism and morality: No necessary connection

Daniel Batson is Professor Emeritus in Department of Psychology at University of Kansas.

 

Chapter 3. Empathy and morality: A developmental psychology perspective

Tracy L. Spinrad is Associate Professor in the School of Social and Family Dynamics at Arizona State University.

Nancy Eisenberg is Regents' Professor in the Department of Psychology at Arizona State University.


Chapter 4. Empathy, justice, and social change

Martin L. Hoffman is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Psychology at New York University.

 

Chapter 5. Empathy, emotion regulation, and moral judgment

Antti Kauppinen is Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Trinity College Dublin.

 

Chapter 6. At the empathetic center of our moral lives

George Graham is Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Georgia State University.

K. Richard Garrett is Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Bentley University.

 

Chapter 7. Empathic and moral deficits in psychopathy.

Abigail A. Marsh is Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at Georgetown University.

 

Chapter 8. Are empathy and morality linked?  Evidence from moral psychology, social and decision neuroscience, and philosophy

Giuseppe Ugazio is Postdoctoral Researcher in the Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience Unit of the Department of Basic Psychological Research and Research Methods at the University of Vienna.

Jasminka Majdandzic is Postdoctoral Researcher in the Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience Unit of the Department of Basic Psychological Research and Research Methods at the University of Vienna.

Claus Lamm is Professor and Head of the Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience Unit of the Department of Basic Psychological Research and Research Methods at the University of Vienna.

 

Chapter 9. On empathy: A perspective from developmental psychopathology.

R. Peter Hobson is Professor of Developmental Psychopathology in the Behavioural and Brain Sciences Unit of the Institute of Child Health at University College London and the Tavistock Clinic.

Jessica Hobson is Senior Research Fellow in the Behavioural and Brain Sciences Unit of Institute of Child Health at University College London.

 

Chapter 10. Empathy in other apes.

Lori Gruen is Professor of Philosophy, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, and Environmental Studies at Wesleyan University.

Kristin Andrews is Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy at York University.

 

Chapter 11. Psychological altruism, empathy, and offender rehabilitation.

Tony Ward is Professor in the School of Psychology at Victoria University of Wellington.


Russil Durrant is Senior Lecturer in the School of Social and Cultural Studies at Victoria University of Wellington.

 

Chapter 12. Empathy and morality in ethnographic perspective

Douglas Hollan is Professor of Anthropology and Luckman Distinguished Teacher at UCLA, co-director of the FPR-UCLA Culture, Brain, and Development Program in Mental Health, and an instructor at the New Center for Psychoanalysis in Los Angeles.

 

 

 

Empathy, Emotion Regulation, and Moral Judgment  
by Antti Kauppinen
"Empathy and Morality , Oxford University Press.In recent years, some striking claims have been made about the importance of empathy – roughly, the capacity to share the feelings of others – to morality and prosocial action. Perhaps most notably, Michael Slote (2007, 2010) maintains that empathy is the “cement of the moral universe” that “arguably constitutes the basis of both meta ethics and normativeethics” (2010, 4).

As inevitably happens with philosophical enthusiasms, there has also been a backlash, even among those who believe emotions are central to moral thought. Within the sentimentalist camp, Jesse Prinz (2011a, b) makes a thorough case against empathy, arguing it’s neither constitutively, causally, developmentally, epistemically, nor motivationally necessary for moralizing. Indeed, Prinz argues that empathy is likely to lead us astray in moral thought, however important it is for personal relationships. Shaun Nichols (2004) and Jonathan Haidt (2012) also emphasize the role of non-empathetic emotional responses such as disgust in moral thinking."

 

 

 

Feeling for Others: Empathy, Sympathy and Morality.
Edited by Heidi L. Maibom
Inquiry, 52 483-99 (2009).
"An increasingly popular suggestion is that empathy and/or sympathy plays a foundational role in understanding harm norms and being motivated by them. In this paper, I argue these emotions play a rather more moderate role in harms norms than we are often led to believe. Evidence from people with frontal lobe damage suggests that neither empathy, nor sympathy is necessary for the understanding of such norms. Furthermore, people’s understanding of why it is wrong to harm varies and is by no means limited to considerations of welfare arising from the abilities to sympathize and/ or empathize. And the sorts of considerations of welfare that are central to sympathy and, to some extent empathy, are often already moralized. As such, these considerations cannot form the non-moral foundation of harm norms. Finally, empathy and sympathy are not the only emotions that motivate harm norms. "