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Culture of Empathy Builder:  Nadine Dolby

 

 Nadine Dolby
Professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, College of Education, Purdue University
Author: Rethinking Multicultural Education for the Next Generation: The New Empathy and Social Justice
 


 

 Nadine Dolby & Edwin Rutsch: Dialogs on How to Build a Culture of Empathy in Education
Professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, College of Education, Purdue University
Author: Rethinking Multicultural Education for the Next Generation: The New Empathy and Social Justice
By drawing on breakthrough research in two fields—neuroscience and animal studies—Nadine Dolby argues that empathy is an underlying element of all living beings. Dolby shows how this commonality can provide a scaffolding for building an exciting new approach to developing multicultural and global consciousness, one that has the potential to transform how our students see and relate to the world around them.


 

 

 

Nadine Dolby & Edwin Rutsch: Dialogs on How to Build a Culture of Empathy in Education

 

The first point sets up the book/conversation, by framing through the ways in which the education system today is headed in the wrong direction, and the changes that are needed....
1. change/influence/understand the role of education in promoting empathy and positive change
2. distinguish between sympathy and empathy
3. connect empathy for people to empathy for animals and the environment
4. help people to understand that they can be a source of empathy and positive change
5. reduce reliance on material things for a sense of self-worth

 

(Video Transcriptions: If you would like to take empathic action and create a transcription of this video, check the volunteers page.  The transcriptions will make it easier for other viewers to quickly see the content of this video.)

 

 

 

 


Rethinking Multicultural Education for the Next Generation: The New Empathy and Social Justice

"Rethinking Multicultural Education for the Next Generation builds on the legacy of social justice multicultural education, while recognizing the considerable challenges of reaching today’s college students. By drawing on breakthrough research in two fields—neuroscience and animal studies—Nadine Dolby argues that empathy is an underlying element of all living beings.

 

Dolby shows how this commonality can provide a scaffolding for building an exciting new approach to developing multicultural and global consciousness, one that has the potential to transform how our students see and relate to the world around them. This book features classroom vignettes and reflections, discussion of research with pre-service teachers on the concept of empathy, and pedagogical suggestions for fostering the new empathy in students."

 

Chapters.

  • 1.  Multicultural Teach Education for the New Generation:
        The Change of Social Justice and the Rise of Empathy,

  • 2.  Who Are our Students.

  • 3. Multicultural Teacher Education: Past Present, and future

  • 4. The New Empathy: Rethinking Human Nature

  • 5. Empathy for All: Expanding the Moral Circle

  • 6. Reaching Our Students: The Journey to Empathy

  • 7. The Road from Empathy to Justice

  • 8. A Pedagogy for Erin and Brittany: Towards a New Multicultural Teacher Education

  • Appendix

 

 

The Decline of Empathy and the Future of Liberal Education
By Nadine Dolby
Liberal Education Spring 2013, Vol. 99, No. 2

"By nurturing empathy through a liberal education, we can help our students understand their connections to other humans, animals, and the planet—and perhaps, eventually, find their way back to themselves."