Center for Building a Culture of Empathy

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Culture of Empathy Builder: Paul Zak
http://j.mp/YhPowm
 

Paul Zak & Edwin Rutsch: How to Build a Culture of Empathy with Oxytocin

Paul J. Zak is Professor of Economics and Department Chair, as well as the founding Director of the Center for Neuroeconomics Studies at Claremont Graduate University. He is author of: The Moral Molecule: The source of love and prosperity which   explores the relationship between Oxytocin, empathy, compassion, trust, etc.

 

"The Moral Molecule is a first-hand account of the discovery of a molecule that makes us moral. It reveals that compassion  [and empathy] is part of our human nature, why loneliness can kill you, and why your neighbor may be a psychopath."

Sub Conference: Science

 

 

 

Paul Zak & Edwin Rutsch: Dialogs on How to Build a Culture of Empathy with Oxytocin

 

 

(Video Transcriptions: If you would like to take empathic action and create a transcription of this video, check the volunteers page.  The transcriptions will make it easier for other viewers to quickly see the content of this video.)

 

 

How Oxytocin Boosts Our Empathy And Morality (VIDEO - huffingtonpost

"In his book "The Morality Molecule: How Trust Works," Zak writes about oxytocin, the "love hormone," and the powers it holds over human behavior. Zak joined HuffPost Live's Caroline Modarressy-Tehrani to explain the mechanics of oxytocin's effect on our relationships.

"As social creatures, we need some sort of signaling molecule that says, 'You're safe to be around, I can interact with you,'" he said. "Oxytocin motivates social interactions by reducing stress levels, and it actually improves our immune system, so we get these very subtle signals that you are part of my tribe or my family, so I can affiliate with you.""

 

 

The Moral Molecule
"Renowned neuroscientist and economist Paul J. Zak reveals how a single chemical governs all of our morality and behaviour"

 

 

 

2012-10-01 - Empathy, Neurochemistry, and the Dramatic Arc

 
 

On Youtube: Empathy, Neurochemistry, and the Dramatic Arc: Paul Zak at the Future of StoryTelling 2012
 

"The emotionally charged story recounted at the beginning Dr. Paul Zak’s film—of a terminally ill two-year-old named Ben and his father—offers a simple yet remarkable case study in how the human brain responds to effective storytelling. As part of his study, Dr. Zak, a founding pioneer in the emerging field of neuroeconomics, closely monitored the neural activity of hundreds of people who viewed Ben’s story.

What he discovered is that even the simplest narrative, if it is highly engaging and follows the classic dramatic arc outlined by the German playwright Gustav Freytag, can evoke powerful empathic responses associated with specific neurochemicals, namely cortisol and oxytocin. Those brain responses, in turn, can translate readily into concrete action—in the case of Dr. Zak’s study subjects, generous donations to charity and even monetary gifts to fellow participants."
 

 

2012-10-01 - The Neurochemistry of Empathy, Storytelling, and the Dramatic Arc, Animated
"Stories are powerful because they transport us into other people’s worlds but, in doing that, they change the way our brains work and potentially change our brain chemistry — and that’s what it means to be a social creature."
 

"This week, I’m headed to the Future of Storytelling summit, an unusual cross-disciplinary unconference exploring exactly what it says on the tin. Among the presenters is neuroeconomics pioneer Paul Zak, director of the Center for Neuroeconomic Studies and author of The Moral Molecule: The Source of Love and Prosperity. In this short film on empathy, neurochemistry, and the dramatic arc, directed and edited by my friend Kirby Ferguson and animated by Henrique Barone, Zak takes us inside his lab, where he studies how people respond to stories.

 

 

 

JUNE 25, 20 - Will Oxytocin Keep the Virtual Office Humming?

Mr. Zak gives a lot more hugs than most economists. That is because he has made a specialty of studying the social role of oxytocin, a neurochemical once associated with sex that he says is also critical to trust, empathy and family-like bonds. Oxytocin both fosters and feeds on those behaviors, and can also be created by surmountable challenges, dancing, singing, meditation or marching in a group.

10 May 2012 - The biochemistry of love and empathy

"In his latest book The Moral Molecule, neuroeconomist Paul Zak describes oxytocin’s role in trust, bonding and even virtuous behaviour. New Scientist caught up with him about avoiding the term “the cuddle chemical” and trying not to make a bride faint on her wedding day..
 

 

Paul Zak: Trust, morality -- and oxytocin?

 
"What drives our desire to behave morally? Neuroeconomist Paul Zak shows why he believes oxytocin (he calls it "the moral molecule") is responsible for trust, empathy and other feelings that help build a stable society. A pioneer in the field of neuroeconomics, Paul Zak is uncovering how the hormone oxytocin promotes trust, and proving that love is good for business."

 

7:00 "The change in Oxytocin predicted their feelings of empathy. So it's empathy that makes us connect to other people.

It's empathy that makes us help other people. It's empathy that makes us moral. This idea is not new." (Adam Smith talked about this as well).

 

 

Authors@ Paul Zak on "The Moral Molecule"

 

 

 

Robert Wright and Paul J. Zak (The Moral Molecule, Claremont Graduate University)

 

Paul's new book, "The Moral Molecule" 3:57
Oxytocin, the chemical that causes trust 9:54
Why Paul hugs everyone he meets 6:54
How pickup artists use and abuse oxytocin 4:12
Becoming a better person 4:53
Possible pharmaceutical uses for oxytocin 3:07
 

 

2012-05-17 - Can One Chemical Be the Basis of All Morality?
A Techwise Conversation with Paul Zak, author of The Moral Molecule
BY STEVEN CHERRY

 

 

 

2012-05-00 -The biochemistry of love and empathy
"In his latest book The Moral Molecule, neuroeconomist Paul Zak describes oxytocin’s role in trust, bonding and even virtuous behaviour. New Scientist caught up with him about avoiding the term “the cuddle chemical” and trying not to make a bride faint on her wedding day."

 


2011-04-30 - Oxytocin, Biophysiology, Evolution, Empathy, and Rights
'Fascinating Reason.tv interview with neuroscientist Paul Zak, about the evolved, neurobiological, oxytocin supported propensity to social trust and cooperation. This complements Mises’s insights regarding the nature of empathy and the division of labor in social cooperation and peace.'
 
 


 

2011-07-00 - Paul Zak: Trust, morality -- and oxytocin
What drives our desire to behave morally? Neuroeconomist Paul Zak shows why he believes oxytocin (he calls it "the moral molecule") is responsible for trust, empathy and other feelings that help build a stable society.

 


Youtube:

Horizon - Are You Good Or Bad Part 1
Horizon - Are You Good Or Bad Part 2
Horizon - Are You Good Or Bad Part 3
Horizon - Are You Good Or Bad Part 4
 

Oxytocin - Empathy,  BBC Horizon - Are you Good or Evil? Introduction

Oxytocin - Empathy, Are you Good or Evil 2
'What makes us good or evil? It's a simple but deeply unsettling question. One that scientists are now starting to answer. Horizon meets the researchers who have studied some of the most terrifying people behind bars - psychopathic killers. But there was a shock in store for one of these scientists, Professor Jim Fallon, when he discovered that he had the profile of a psychopath. And the reason he didn't turn out to be a killer holds important lessons for all of us.'

 

 

Paul Zak, PhD, discusses the 'empathy' gene: oxytocin
 


 

Why an Oxytocin-Rich Environment Makes For Better Business
Companies can create an oxytocin-led positive feedback loop, bettering employees and business while making customers happier—or they can lead their business into a downward spiral.


 



Experi Mental Paul Zak Oxytocin

 

 


Moral Markets: Paul Zak discusses Oxytocin, Trade, and Human Nature
(He seems to be a libertarian and is creating arguments for libertarianism?) 

 

 

Social Networking Affects Brains Like Falling in Love
Neuroeconomist Paul Zak has discovered, for the first time, that social networking triggers the release of the generosity-trust chemical in our brains. And that should be a wake-up call for every company.

 

 

Others on Oxytocin

 

Oxytocin - The Chemistry of Love