Center for Building a Culture of Empathy

   Home    Conference   Magazine   Movement   Services    Newsletter   Facebook    Youtube   Contact   Search

Join the International Conference on: How Might We Build a Culture of Empathy and Compassion?


Empathic Design
Empathy Circles

  Restorative Empathy Circles
Training
Conference
Magazine

Expert Interviews
Movement Building
Obama on Empathy
 

References

    Books
    Conferences
    Definitions
    Experts
(100+)
    History
    Organizations
    Quotations
    Empathy Tests

 

Culture of Empathy Builder:  Robert Brooks

http://j.mp/YZOTqP
 

Robert Brooks and Edwin Rutsch: Dialogs on How to Build a Culture of Empathy and Resilience

Robert Brooks is one of today's leading speakers on the themes of resilience, motivation, and family relationships. During the past 30 years, Dr. Brooks has presented nationally and internationally to thousands of parents, educators, mental health professionals, and business people with a message based on encouragement, hope, and resilience. He is on the faculty of Harvard Medical School and the former Director of the Department of Psychology at McLean Hospital.

He is author or co-author of 15 books including: Handbook of Resilience and has written numerous articles about empathy. He writes, "In my workshops and writings I have consistently emphasized the importance of empathy as an essential skill for enriching our lives...  If empathy is not translated into behavior it will indeed be a "sideshow." However, when empathy serves as a guiding light for our behaviors, showing us the path that leads to compassion and caring, it becomes a potent force that will improve the lives not only of our children but ourselves as well. The more we bring together theory, skills, and actions, the more we can engage in activities that permit us to lead purposeful, fulfilling, caring lives.."

 "a common characteristic of individuals who are successful as business leaders, teachers, parents, spouses, or healthcare professionals is their ability to be empathic. Empathic people are skilled in placing themselves inside the shoes of another person and seeing the world through that personís eyes. It is not surprising that Daniel Goleman listed empathy as one of the main components of emotional intelligence. In my activities as a therapist and consultant as well as in my personal life, I have come to believe that empathy is implicated in all of our relationships, impacting on the satisfaction and effectiveness with which we interact with others."
Sub Conference: Home & Family

 

 

 

 

Transcripts

(Video Transcriptions: If you would like to take empathic action and create a transcription of this video, check the volunteers page.  The transcriptions will make it easier for other viewers to quickly see the content of this video.)

 

 

February 15, 1999 - The Importance of Empathy: A Significant Feature of the Mindset of Successful People Ė Part I

"I have frequently been asked at my workshops what I consider to be one of the most salient characteristics of a successful parent or teacher or business leader. While there are several, what I typically mention first is the ability to be empathic. It is interesting that in his seminal writings about the concept of Emotional Intelligence (EQ), Daniel Goleman lists empathy as one of the main components of EQ. I would like to devote the first couple of columns written for my Web site to the concept of empathy."

 

March 15, 1999 - The Importance of Empathy: A Significant Feature of the Mindset of Successful People Ė Part II

"In my last column I emphasized that a common characteristic of individuals who are successful as business leaders, teachers, parents, spouses, or healthcare professionals is their ability to be empathic. Empathic people are skilled in placing themselves inside the shoes of another person and seeing the world through that personís eyes. It is not surprising that Daniel Goleman listed empathy as one of the main components of emotional intelligence. In my activities as a therapist and consultant as well as in my personal life, I have come to believe that empathy is implicated in all of our relationships, impacting on the satisfaction and effectiveness with which we interact with others."

 

 

To Nurture Caring and Empathy in Children: Letís Rely on Modeling and Action, Not Lecturing 
During the past month I have had the opportunity to speak with thousands of staff, faculty, and administrators in school districts throughout the United States as they prepare for the new school year. I am often asked to describe those mindsets and strategies that enrich the social and emotional climate of a classroom- a climate in which motivation, learning, and hope are reinforced in students.

One key message in all of my talks is the importance of providing students with opportunities to contribute to the well-being of others, activities that promote empathy, compassion, and resilience. My decision to devote this month's article to this topic was based, in part, upon reading a piece written by Maia Szalavitz titled "How Not to Raise a Bully: The Early Roots of Empathy."

 

Empathy: Turning Feelings and Beliefs into Action
In my workshops and writings I have consistently emphasized the importance of empathy as an essential skill for enriching our lives...  If empathy is not translated into behavior it will indeed be a "sideshow." However, when empathy serves as a guiding light for our behaviors, showing us the path that leads to compassion and caring, it becomes a potent force that will improve the lives not only of our children but ourselves as well. The more we bring together theory, skills, and actions, the more we can engage in activities that permit us to lead purposeful, fulfilling, caring lives.